English Adverbs

English Adverbs

If you're trying to learn English Adverbs you will find some useful resources including a course about Adverbs of time place manner and frequency... to help you with your English grammar. Try to concentrate on the lesson and notice the pattern that occurs each time the word changes its place. Also don't forget to check the rest of our other lessons listed on Learn English. Enjoy the rest of the lesson!

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English Adverbs

Learning the English Adverbs is very important because its structure is used in every day conversation. The more you practice the subject, the closer you get to mastering the English language. But first we need to know what the role of Adverbs is in the structure of the grammar in English.

English adverbs are part of speech. Generally they're words that modify any part of language other than a noun. Adverbs can modify verbs, adjectives (including numbers), clauses, sentences and other adverbs.

The adverb tells you (how, why, when, where) something happened. Usually an adverb is formed from an adjective, and you simply need to add the suffix (-ly): quick becomes quickly, easy becomes easily (note that "y" becomes "i" before adding "ly"), happy becomes happily...

Note that some adverbs don’t need to take (-ly), like: hard, fast …etc

 

Adverbs can come before adjective: He is actually tall.

Adverbs can come before other adverbs if they’re modifying them: she pushed him really hard.

Adverbs can modify nouns it’s really a nice house, as you have noticed there is an adjective between (really) and (a house).

-Some adverbs indicate intensity (how strong or intense something was): almost, entirely, extremely, highly, partially, practically, strongly, totally, very

I entirely agree with you, we strongly recommend this website.

-Some adverbs indicate duration (how long something happened): briefly, forever, shortly, permanently, temporarily

She can’t wait for you forever, she would like to live in the USA permanently, but is temporarily working in Japan.

-These adverbs indicate a degree of frequency or how many times you do something …, we will start with the most frequent, and we will end with the least frequent:

Always, constantly, usually, generally, normally, regularly, often, frequently, sometimes, periodically, occasionally, now and then, once in a while, rarely, seldom, hardly ever, almost never, never. Also you can use the expressions: daily (every day), weekly (every week), monthly (every month), yearly (every year) …

He usually speaks English, but sometimes he speaks Spanish with his wife, and once in a while speaks German with his friend from Germany, but never speaks Russian because he can’t speak it. He travels to Mexico monthly or every two months with his wife because he lives in Texas.

-Some adverbs can indicate the manner in which something was done or happened, usually this kind of adverbs take (-ly): badly, quickly, beautifully, smoothly

The cake was decorated beautifully and everything was going smoothly, the cook was trying to cut the cake quickly, but he dropped it on the floor, so his day ended badly.

-Adverbs of place are: here, there, inside, outside, upstairs, downstairs… Examples: We will stay here with you, while the rest stays there, we feel warm inside, but I think our friends outside will need some umbrellas because it’s raining, I will go and look for them downstairs and if I don’t find them I will look upstairs.

-Adverbs of probability are used to express how likely it is for something to happen: Probably, certainly, definitely, maybe, perhaps, possibly … Note that probably, maybe, perhaps, possibly mean that the person is not sure if the thing will happen or will be done.

- Will you come to the party?

- Probably! (it means maybe I will come, and maybe not, other similar expressions are maybe, perhaps, possibly …)

- Can you call me if you’re not coming to the party?

- Definitely! (also certainly can be used, which means that I’m sure that I’ will call whether I decide to come to the party or not).

 

-Some adverbs indicate time, such as: today, yesterday, now, later, soon, already, still, finally… Examples:

Finally school is opening today, yesterday was the last day of vacation, I still wish that the vacation was longer, because exams will start soon, and we will be tested later.

 

Here are some examples:

English Adverbs
adverbs
I read a book sometimes
I will never smoke
are you alone?

As you can see from the example above, the structure of the Adverbs in English has a logical pattern. Locate the Adverbs above and see how it works with the rest of the sentence in English.

List of Adverbs in English

Below is a list of the Adverbs of time place manner and frequency in English placed in a table. Memorizing this table will help you add very useful and important words to your English vocabulary.

English Adverbs
adverbs of time
yesterday
today
tomorrow
now
then
later
tonight
right now
last night
this morning
next week
already
recently
lately
soon
immediately
still
yet
ago
adverbs of place
here
there
over there
everywhere
anywhere
nowhere
home
away
out
adverbs of manner
very
quite
pretty
really
fast
well
hard
quickly
slowly
carefully
hardly
barely
mostly
almost
absolutely
together
alone
adverbs of frequency
always
frequently
usually
sometimes
occasionally
seldom
rarely
never

Adverbs of time place manner and frequency have a very important role in English, therefore they need very special attention. Once you're done with English Adverbs, you might want to check the rest of our English lessons here: Learn English. Don't forget to bookmark this page.


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